Powerful steps to Oracle Relational Database creating risk-free

Powerful steps to Oracle Relational Database creating risk-free
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As with any new technology or new venture, it's sensible to think through not only the benefits and opportunities that are presented, but also the costs and risks. Combine a relational database with a series of powerful and easy-to-use tools, as Oracle does, and the possibility of being seduced into disaster by its simplicity becomes real. Add in object-oriented and web capabilities, and the dangers increase. This article discusses some of the dangers that both developers and users need to consider.

 

Is It Really as Easy as They Say?

According to the database vendors - the industry evangelists - developing an application using a relational database and the associated "fourth-generation" tools will be as much as 20 times faster than traditional system development. And it will be very easy: ultimately, programmers and systems analysts will be used less, and end users will control their own destinies.

Critics of the relational approach warn that relational systems are inherently slower than others, that users who are given control of query and report writing will overwhelm computers, and that a company will lose face and fortune if a more traditional approach is not taken. The press cites stories of huge applications that simply failed to run when they were put into production.

So, what's the truth? The truth is that the rules of the game have changed. Fourth-generation development efforts make very different demands upon companies and management than do more traditional methods. There are issues and risks that are brand new and not obvious. Once these are identified and understood, the risk is no greater, and probably much smaller, than in traditional development.

 

What Are the Risks?

The primary risk is that developing relational database applications is as easy as they say. Understanding tables, columns, and rows isn't difficult. The relationship between two tables is conceptually simple. Even normalization, the process of analyzing the inherent or "normal" relationships between the various elements of a company's data, is fairly easy to learn.

Unfortunately, this often produces instant "experts," full of confidence but with little experience in building real, production-quality applications. For a tiny marketing database, or a home inventory application, this doesn't matter very much. The mistakes made will reveal themselves in time, the lessons will be learned, and the errors will be avoided the next time around. In an important application, however, this is a sure formula for disaster. This lack of experience is usually behind the press's stories of major project failures.

Older development methods are generally slower, primarily because the tasks of the older methods—coding, submitting a job for compilation, linking, and testing—result in a slower pace. The cycle, particularly on a mainframe, is often so tedious that programmers spend a good deal of time "desk-checking" in order to avoid going through the delay of another full cycle because of an error in the code.

Fourth-generation tools seduce developers into rushing into production. Changes can be made and implemented so quickly that testing is given short shrift. The elimination of virtually all desk-checking compounds the problem. When the negative incentive (the long cycle) that encouraged desk-checking disappeared, desk-checking went with it. The attitude of many seems to be, "If the application isn't quite right, we can fix it quickly. If the data gets corrupted, we can patch it with a quick update. If it's not fast enough, we can tune it on the fly. Let's get it in ahead of schedule and show the stuff we're made of."

This problem is made worse by an interesting sociological phenomenon: Many of the developers of relational applications are recent college graduates. They've learned relational or object-oriented theory and design in school and are ready to make their mark. More seasoned developers, as a class, haven't learned the new technology. They're busy supporting and enhancing the technologies they know, which support their companies' current information systems. The result is that inexperienced developers tend to end up on the relational projects, are sometimes less inclined to test, and are less sensitive to the consequences of failure than those who have already lived through several complete application development cycles.

The testing cycle in an important Oracle project should be longer and more thorough than in a traditional project. This is true even if proper project controls are in place, and even if seasoned project managers are guiding the project, because there will be less desk-checking and an inherent overconfidence. This testing must check the correctness of data entry screens and reports, of data loads and updates, of data integrity and concurrence, and particularly of transaction and storage volumes during peak loads.

Because it really is as easy as they say, application development with Oracle's tools can be breathtakingly rapid. But this automatically reduces the amount of testing done as a normal part of development, and the planned testing and quality assurance must be consciously lengthened to compensate. This is not usually foreseen by those new to either Oracle or fourth-generation tools, but you must budget for it in your project plan.

 

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Comments on Powerful steps to Oracle Relational Database creating risk-free

Pesok
Pesok well done! You are smart thinking in database designe!) 1 year ago
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